Links to Research Articles on Central Coherence Theories of Autism

  • Beaumont R, Newcombe P. (2006). Theory of mind and central coherence in adults with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. Autism, 10(4), pp. 365-382. Read Abstract
  • Best C.S. et al. (2007). The boundaries of the cognitive phenotype of autism: Theory of mind, central coherence and ambiguous figure perception in young people with autistic traits. J Autism Dev Disord. [Epub ahead of print]. Read Abstract
  • Bölte S, Poustka F. (2006). The broader cognitive phenotype of autism in parents: how specific is the tendency for local processing and executive dysfunction? J Child Psychol Psychiatry, 47(6), pp. 639-645. Read Abstract
  • Booth, R. et al. (2003). Disentangling weak coherence and executive dysfunction: planning drawing in autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, B, 358, 387–392. Read Abstract
  • Brian, J. A., and Bryson, S. E. (1996). Disembedding performance and recognition memory in autism/PDD. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 37, 865–872. Read Abstract
  • Brosnan, M. J. et al. (2004). Gestalt processing in autism: Failure to process relationships and the implications for contextual understanding. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 45, 459–469. Read Abstract
  • Burnette, C. P. et al. (2005). Weak central coherence and its relations to theory of mind and anxiety in autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 35, 63–73. Read Abstract
  • Caron M.J. et al. (2006). Cognitive mechanisms, specificity and neural underpinnings of visuospatial peaks in autism. Brain, 129(7), pp 1789-1802. Read Abstract
  • Happé, F., and Frith, U. (2006). The weak coherence account: Detail-focused cognitive style in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 36, pp. 5–25. Read Abstract
  • Happé F.G, and Booth RD. (2008). The power of the positive: Revisiting weak coherence in autism spectrum disorders. Q J Exp Psychol (Colchester), 61(1), pp. 50-63. Read Abstract
  • Jolliffe T, Baron-Cohen S. (2001). A test of central coherence theory: can adults with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome integrate fragments of an object? Cognit Neuropsychiatry, 6(3), pp. 193-216. Read Abstract
  • Kaland N., Mortensen E-L, and Smith L. (2007). Disembedding performance in children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome or high-functioning autism. Autism, 11(1), pp. 81-92. Read Abstract
  • López, B, and Leekam, S.R. (2003). Do children with autism fail to process information in context? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 44 (2), 285–300. Read Abstract
  • López, B., Leekam, S.R. and Gerda R.J. (2008). How central is central coherence?: Preliminary evidence on the link between conceptual and perceptual processing in children with autism. Autism, 12(2), pp. 159-171. Read Abstract
  • Loth E, Gomez J.C, and Happe F. (2008). Event schemas in autism spectrum disorders: The role of theory of mind and weak central coherence. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 38(3), pp.  449-463. Read Abstract
  • McCrory, E., Henry, L.A., and Happé, F. (2007). Eye-witness memory and suggestibility in children with Asperger syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 48 (5), 482–489. Read Abstract
  • Manjaly ZM et al. (2007). Neurophysiological correlates of relatively enhanced local visual search in autistic adolescents. Neuroimage, 35(1), pp. 283-291. Read Abstract
  • Mottron, L. et al. (1999). Perceptual Processing among High-functioning Persons with Autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 40 (2), 203–211. Read Abstract
  • Mottron, L et al. (2003). Locally oriented perception with intact global processing among adolescents with high-functioning autism: evidence from multiple paradigms. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 44 (6), 904–913. Read Abstract
  • Nakahachi T. et al. (2008). Disturbed holistic processing in autism spectrum disorders verified by two cognitive tasks requiring perception of complex visual stimuli. Psychiatry Res. 159(3), pp. 330-338. Read Abstract
  • Noens, I.L.J. and van Berckelaer-Onnes, I.A. (2008). The central coherence account of autism revisited: Evidence from the ComFor study. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 2(2), pp. 209-222. Read Abstract
  • O’Connor K., Kirk I. (2008). Brief report: Atypical social cognition and social behaviours in autism spectrum disorder: A different way of processing rather than an impairment. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Read Abstract
  • Ozonoff, S. et al. (1994). Executive Function Abilities in Autism and Tourette Syndrome: An Information Processing Approach. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 35 (6), 1015–1032. Read Abstract
  • Pellicano E. et al. (2006). Multiple cognitive capabilities/deficits in children with an autism spectrum disorder: “weak” central coherence and its relationship to theory of mind and executive control. Dev Psychopathol, 18(1), pp. 77-98. Read Abstract
  • Pring, L., Hermelin, B., & Heavey, L. (1995). Savants, segments, art and autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 36, 1065–1076. Read Abstract
  • Ropar, D., & Mitchell, P. (2001). Susceptibility to illusions and performance on visuospatial tasks in individuals with autism. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 42, 539–549. Read Abstract
  • Shah A.; Frith U. (1993). Why do autistic individuals show superior performance on the block design task?  Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry and allied disciplines, 34(8), pp. 1351-1364. Read Abstract
  • Sheppard, E., Ropar, D. and Mitchell, P. (2007). The impact of meaning and dimensionality on copying accuracy in individuals with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(10), pp. 1913-1924. Read Abstract
  • South,M., Ozonoff,S. and Mcmahon, W.M. (2007). The relationship between executive functioning, central coherence, and repetitive behaviors in the high-functioning autism spectrum.  Autism, 11(5), pp. 437-451. Read Abstract